Mounting Pollution at Home Threatens South Korea’s Leadership on Climate Policy

A Seoul cityscape covered with a thick haze of fine dust particles, South Korea, March 5, 2019 (AP photo by Ahn Youn).
A Seoul cityscape covered with a thick haze of fine dust particles, South Korea, March 5, 2019 (AP photo by Ahn Youn).

SEOUL—Most of the time, the existential issue of North Korea dominates dialogue between South Korea and its major allies and neighbors. But as I found out on a recent trip to Seoul, this fast-changing and dynamic society is beginning to see climate and environmental hazards as real priorities, too. As South Korea establishes its place as a G-20 developed economy and looks for ways to take on more responsibility in global governance, the tough tradeoffs between its economic growth and its adaptation to climate realities are becoming clearer. South Korean leaders are beginning to recognize that they need to do […]

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