Mongolia Shuffles PMs to Address Self-Inflicted Economic Crisis

Mongolia Shuffles PMs to Address Self-Inflicted Economic Crisis
Then-Mongolian Prime Minister Norov Altankhuyag speaks during the International Labor Conference, Geneva, Switzerland, June 9, 2014 (AP photo/Keystone, Jean-Christophe Bott).

Last week, Mongolia’s parliament appointed Chimed Saikhanbileg prime minister, two weeks after Norov Altankhuyag lost a no-confidence vote. In an email interview, Julian Dierkes, associate professor at the University of British Columbia, discussed Mongolian politics.

WPR: What factors explain the recent no-confidence vote against former Prime Minister Norov Altankhuyag?

Julian Dierkes: Surprisingly, Norov Altankhuyag was the longest-serving prime minister from the Democratic Party (DP). However, during the two and a half years that he was in office, Mongolia came to face an economic crisis that was largely government-made through strict foreign investment regulation and poor fiscal decisions. Altankhuyag did not show any indications that he had a particular policy goal in mind for his government. Yet he was evidently skillful at keeping his coalition with the Justice Coalition and the Civil Will Green Party intact.

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