Modi’s Visit Shows Promise of Renewing U.S.-India Ties

Modi’s Visit Shows Promise of Renewing U.S.-India Ties
President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi travel by motorcade en route to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., Sept. 30, 2014 (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza).

Last week, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed the United Nations General Assembly, met with business leaders in New York and held talks with U.S. President Barack Obama in Washington. Though no concrete deals were made, there was progress on improving the strained relationship between India and the U.S.

The visit was also significant since Modi was denied a visa to the U.S. in 2004, owing to his failure as chief minister of Gujarat to prevent a 2002 outbreak of religious violence that left over 1,000 people dead.

Unsurprisingly, strengthening economic ties was high on Modi’s agenda. During a breakfast meeting in New York last Monday, he told a group of 11 executives of U.S. firms, including Boeing and Caterpillar, that he is committed to liberalizing India’s economy.

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