Mexico’s Water Dispute With the U.S. Is a Symptom of Its Governance Crisis

Mexican National Guard troops stand guard at Las Pilas dam in Camargo, Mexico, Sept. 10, 2020 (AP photo by Christian Chavez).
Mexican National Guard troops stand guard at Las Pilas dam in Camargo, Mexico, Sept. 10, 2020 (AP photo by Christian Chavez).

For nearly 75 years, the United States and Mexico have transferred giant quantities of water to each other each year as part of a system set up to ensure the equitable sharing of water sheds that straddle their border. The terms and obligations are clearly laid out in a treaty the two sides signed in 1944: The U.S. sends 489 billion gallons of water southward via the Colorado River, and Mexico allocates 114 billion gallons northward, from the Rio Grande and the Rio Conchos. To deal with the technical aspects of this water exchange and settle any issues, the two […]

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