Mexico’s Energy Reforms Miss a Key Sector: Renewables

Members of the government, including PEMEX chief Emilio Lozoya, far left, attend a ceremony for the signing of a historic energy reform bill, at the National Palace in Mexico City, Aug. 11, 2014 (AP photo by Rebecca Blackwell).
Members of the government, including PEMEX chief Emilio Lozoya, far left, attend a ceremony for the signing of a historic energy reform bill, at the National Palace in Mexico City, Aug. 11, 2014 (AP photo by Rebecca Blackwell).

On Dec. 20, Mexico will reach its cutoff for the approval of legislation related to President Enrique Pena Nieto’s sweeping energy reforms. Yet while the focus is on Mexico’s oil and gas sector, this deadline is likely to come and go without any serious debate on the future of renewable energy. With its abundance of wind, solar and geothermal resources, the renewables industry should thrive in Mexico. Indeed, many hoped Pena Nieto’s reforms would catalyze it. Instead, Mexico risks missing an opportunity to make good on its commitment to a clean energy future and to tackling and adapting to climate […]

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