Lebanon’s Elections Show Hezbollah Survived Its Intervention in Syria

Lebanon’s Elections Show Hezbollah Survived Its Intervention in Syria
Supporters of Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah hold a banner with his portrait during an election rally, Beirut, Lebanon, April 13, 2018 (AP photo by Hussein Malla).

For the first time in almost a decade, Lebanese voters went to the polls last weekend and delivered a subtle but important message with regional ramifications. The results will do nothing to ease tensions, instead sharpening enmity between Saudi Arabia and Iran while marginally increasing fears of an impending confrontation between Israel and Iran and its Lebanese proxy, Hezbollah. From a regional perspective, the outcome of the Lebanese election is clear: Iran has grown more powerful inside Lebanon, adding to Tehran’s influence across the Middle East. The election strengthened the hand of Hezbollah, the militant Shiite organization and political party […]

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