Latest Government Turnover Reflects Madagascar’s Political Volatility

Latest Government Turnover Reflects Madagascar’s Political Volatility
Madagascan President Hery Rajaonarimampianina speaks at a U.N. Climate Summit, Sep. 23, 2014 (U.N. photo by Rick Bajornas).

Last month, Solonandrasana Olivier Mahafaly became prime minister of Madagascar after Jean Ravelonarivo resigned, ostensibly, due to disagreements with President Hery Rajaonarimampianina over development policy. In an email interview, Professor Richard R. Marcus, the director of the Global Studies Institute at California State University, Long Beach, discussed politics in Madagascar and the country’s political reconciliation.

WPR: What are the reasons behind Madagascan Prime Minister Jean Ravelonarivo’s resignation?

Richard Marcus: Ravelonarivo was brought in to perform an impossible role. His predecessor, Roger Kolo, survived only 276 days in office, largely due to his confrontations with President Rajaonarimampianina and his inability to unite diverse political factions. Rajaonarimampianina’s appointment of Ravelonarivo, a general, as prime minister was clever and telling. As a leader in the public, private, civil society and military sectors, Ravelonarivo was a sort of bridge between divergent political interests, the private sector and an uncomfortably disquieted military.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.