Kuwait Is Walking a Tight Rope in the Gulf as the Qatar Crisis Continues

President Donald Trump greets Kuwait’s emir, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah, at the White House, Washington, Sept. 7, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
President Donald Trump greets Kuwait’s emir, Sheikh Sabah al-Ahmad al-Jaber al-Sabah, at the White House, Washington, Sept. 7, 2017 (AP photo by Carolyn Kaster).
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The meeting in the White House last week between the ruler of Kuwait and President Donald Trump set off a flurry of diplomatic activity. For a moment, it appeared as though it might lead to an opening for resolving the three-month-old dispute that has divided U.S. allies in the Persian Gulf, with Qatar on one side and a Saudi-led bloc of four countries on the other. Hopes were dashed, however, when the efforts collapsed into even more bitter acrimony between Saudi Arabia and Qatar. But this time, there was a new twist in the dispute: Some of the invective, though […]

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