Israel’s Urban Policies an Unseen Driver of Jerusalem Tensions

Palestinians hang a national flag from the apartment of Abdel Rahman al-Shaludi in East Jerusalem. Israeli authorities demolished it after Shaludi’s deadly attack with his car on a Jerusalem train station last month, (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean).
Palestinians hang a national flag from the apartment of Abdel Rahman al-Shaludi in East Jerusalem. Israeli authorities demolished it after Shaludi’s deadly attack with his car on a Jerusalem train station last month, (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean).

The spikes in violence in Jerusalem last month, including the brutal killings in a synagogue after a series of stabbings and hit-and-run attacks on pedestrians, are extreme instances of ethnically based violence that has been mounting since last summer, when the flames of local unrest were fanned by the war in Gaza. But at stake are more than familiar grievances in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. While access to the holy sites of the Temple Mount or Haram al-Sharif remains contentious, the violence in Jerusalem’s shared public spaces and on public transportation in particular reflect that this is not merely an issue […]

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