Is Tillerson Using Egypt to Finally Chart His Own Path at the State Department?

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Donald Trump listen as Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi speaks during a bilateral meeting, Washington, Apr. 3, 2017 (AP photo by Andrew Harnik).
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and President Donald Trump listen as Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sissi speaks during a bilateral meeting, Washington, Apr. 3, 2017 (AP photo by Andrew Harnik).
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Since taking office, U.S. President Donald Trump has run an erratic foreign policy, failing to deliver a clear and consistent message to allies and enemies alike. So, when the State Department decided to cut and withhold a combined $295 million in economic and military aid to Egypt last week, despite exceedingly warm relations between Trump and Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, many were once again left scratching their heads. For nearly a year, Trump has been an ardent supporter of the regime in Cairo, ending an era of rough-and-tumble relations between Egypt and the Obama administration. Sisi, for his part, was […]

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