Is France’s Modest Increase to Its Sahel Force Too Little, Too Late?

French President Emmanuel Macron, center, Nigerien President Mahamadou Issoufou, right, and Chadian President Idriss Deby during a press conference in Pau, France, Jan. 13, 2020 (Photo by Guillaume Horcajuelo for EPA via AP Images).
French President Emmanuel Macron, center, Nigerien President Mahamadou Issoufou, right, and Chadian President Idriss Deby during a press conference in Pau, France, Jan. 13, 2020 (Photo by Guillaume Horcajuelo for EPA via AP Images).

Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. At a security summit in southern France this week, French President Emmanuel Macron and the leaders of five countries in Africa’s Sahel region agreed to modest increases in their joint military efforts to combat Islamist extremists. Macron pledged to send an additional 220 French troops to the Sahel to bolster the 4,500-strong French military mission that has been there since 2013. He also issued a plea to President Donald Trump not to reduce the U.S. troop presence in Africa—an appeal the Trump […]

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