Is COP21 Climate Change Deal Multilateralism’s Swan Song?

French President Francois Hollande, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the the United Nations conference on climate change, Le Bourget, France, Dec. 12, 2015 (AP photo by Francois Mori).
French President Francois Hollande, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon at the the United Nations conference on climate change, Le Bourget, France, Dec. 12, 2015 (AP photo by Francois Mori).
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Free Newsletter

The climate change agreement hammered out at the COP21 conference in Paris this weekend inspires a cocktail of contradictory emotions: relief, cynicism, awe and melancholy. It is hard not to be relieved that world leaders have finally agreed on an ambitious agenda to limit global warming. It is equally difficult not to read their pledges with some skepticism. While the Paris deal was bolder than many had predicted, aiming to stop global temperatures rising by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, many crucial parts of the deal are not legally binding. The package only has a chance of success if major […]

TO READ MORE

Enter your email to get instant access to this article and to receive our free email newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having your own personal researcher and analyst for news and events around the globe. Become a member now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of 15,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Daily links to must-read news, analysis, and opinion from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • Weekly in-depth reports, including features on important countries and issues.
  • Your choice of weekly region-specific newsletters, delivered to your inbox.
  • Smartphone- and tablet-friendly website.

And all of this is available to you — right now for just $1 for the first 3 months.

More World Politics Review