Is Clinton Taking the Fall for Obama’s Libya Missteps?

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies before the House Benghazi Committee, Washington, Oct. 22, 2015 (AP photo by Manuel Balce Ceneta).
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton testifies before the House Benghazi Committee, Washington, Oct. 22, 2015 (AP photo by Manuel Balce Ceneta).

Over the weekend, The New York Times ran two major articles looking at Hillary Clinton’s role in the Obama administration’s deliberations over whether or not to intervene in the Libyan civil war in 2011. They offer what is, at times, a damning critique that portrays Clinton, then the U.S. secretary of state, as eager to get involved in Libya, but less interested in what might come after the U.S. intervention. A deeper look at the articles, however, suggests a greater indictment of President Barack Obama for his willingness to get involved in Libya but not to see the mission through. […]

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