India Takes a Bold Approach in Border Standoff With China, but the Endgame Is Unclear

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping during the BRICS Leaders Meeting, Goa, India, Oct. 16, 2016 (AP photo by Manish Swarup).
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Chinese President Xi Jinping during the BRICS Leaders Meeting, Goa, India, Oct. 16, 2016 (AP photo by Manish Swarup).
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The border standoff between Indian and Chinese troops on the remote Doklam area in the Himalayas is approaching the two-month mark with no end in sight. Simultaneously egged on and hemmed in by nationalistic fervor at home, neither government can afford to back down, making escalation a real risk. India’s national security adviser, Ajit Doval, met with China’s state councilor, Yang Jiechi, and President Xi Jinping at the end of July, but the two sides failed to reach an agreement to quell the border row. The most serious dispute between India and China in decades, the standoff at Doklam represents […]

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