In the Post-Compaore Era, Burkina Faso’s Courts Try to Find Their Voice

Gen. Gilbert Diendere greets people at the airport during the arrival of Nigerien President Mahamadou Issoufou for talks about the 2015 coup, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Sept. 23, 2015 (AP photo).
Gen. Gilbert Diendere greets people at the airport during the arrival of Nigerien President Mahamadou Issoufou for talks about the 2015 coup, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Sept. 23, 2015 (AP photo).
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A court in Burkina Faso was due to resume hearings this morning in a trial against the alleged perpetrators of a short-lived coup nearly three years ago that came close to derailing the West African nation’s transition away from quasi-authoritarian rule. In September 2015, members of the country’s presidential guard stormed a Cabinet meeting in the capital, Ouagadougou, taking the country’s acting president, Michel Kafando, hostage along with the acting prime minister and several other high-ranking officials. Kafando’s transitional government had been installed after a popular uprising in October 2014 forced the resignation of Blaise Compaore, who served as president […]

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