In the Eyes of Protesters, Liberia’s Weah Has Gone ‘From Hero to Let-Down’

Liberian President George Weah attends the opening session of the Internet Governance Forum at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, Nov. 12, 2018 (Photo by Liewig Christian for Sipa via AP Images).
Liberian President George Weah attends the opening session of the Internet Governance Forum at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France, Nov. 12, 2018 (Photo by Liewig Christian for Sipa via AP Images).
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Thousands of people gathered in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia, earlier this month to protest against a faltering economy and widespread corruption in the government. They blame President George Weah, a former football star who took office last year amid heightened expectations. Since then, corruption has continued to run rampant and economic conditions have only worsened. In an email interview with WPR, Elizabeth Donnelly, deputy head of the Africa Program at Chatham House in London, discusses the recent demonstrations and whether there is anything Weah can do to regain his “man of the people” image. World Politics Review: How significant was the […]

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