In Sri Lanka, Concern Over University Quality Drives Privatization Debate

Sri Lankan university students shout anti-government slogans during a protest, Colombo, Sri Lanka, May 17, 2017 (AP photo by Eranga Jayawardena).
Sri Lankan university students shout anti-government slogans during a protest, Colombo, Sri Lanka, May 17, 2017 (AP photo by Eranga Jayawardena).
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Editor’s Note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series about education policy in various countries around the world. In Sri Lanka, controversy surrounding a private medical university has led to months of demonstrations and fierce debate on the merits of private education institutions in general. Last month, in Colombo, police used tear gas to disperse thousands of protesters who, according to the Associated Press, ignored an official protest ban to make their case that the medical university, the South Asian Institute of Technology and Medicine, should be shut down. In an email interview, Nisha Arunatilake, a fellow with […]

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