In Papua New Guinea’s Elections, It’s Familiar Faces—and Problems

Prime Minister James Marape of of Papua New Guinea addresses the U.N. General Assembly, Sept. 24, 2021, New York (Pool photo by Peter Foley via AP).
Prime Minister James Marape of of Papua New Guinea addresses the U.N. General Assembly, Sept. 24, 2021, New York (Pool photo by Peter Foley via AP).
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It’s a case of new election, same old faces in Papua New Guinea, where voting for the Pacific Islands nation’s general elections began on July 4. Nevertheless, turnout is expected to be relatively strong: Half the population of about 10 million is projected to head to the polls over the coming weeks, with some areas having almost three weeks to vote due to the remoteness of many communities. Incumbent Prime Minister James Marape, who heads the Pangu Party, is facing off against Peter O’Neill, the man he replaced in May 2019, when O’Neill resigned rather than face a no-confidence vote after […]

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