Kyrgyzstan’s Descent Into Mob Rule Bodes Ill for Its Future

Supporters of Kyrgyzstan’s new prime minister, Sadyr Japarov, at a rally in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Oct. 15, 2020 (AP photo by Vladimir Voronin).
Supporters of Kyrgyzstan’s new prime minister, Sadyr Japarov, at a rally in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, Oct. 15, 2020 (AP photo by Vladimir Voronin).
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Kyrgyzstan is in the midst of historic political upheaval, spurred on by nearly three decades of government misrule, a frustrated civil society and the rise of unsavory criminal groups to positions of power. With the resignation last week of President Sooronbai Jeenbekov amid mass protests, and his shocking replacement by a convicted felon freshly sprung from jail, the Central Asian nation looks set for more volatility—and the Kyrgyz people will pay the price. The trouble began with parliamentary elections on Oct. 4, which were marred by blatant evidence of fraud and vote-buying on behalf of government-friendly candidates. Official results showed […]

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