In Familiar Move, U.N. Recycles Old Proposals to End Syria’s War

U.N. Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria Staffan de Mistura listens during a United Nations Security Council meeting on Syria, New York, July 29, 2015 (AP photo by Bebeto Matthews).
U.N. Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Syria Staffan de Mistura listens during a United Nations Security Council meeting on Syria, New York, July 29, 2015 (AP photo by Bebeto Matthews).

Peacemaking is a repetitive business. Mediators and diplomats handling protracted conflicts rarely come up with entirely new ways to end them. They frequently revise and repackage previous peace plans, hoping that they will gain more traction than they have in the past. The U.N. Security Council did just that last week, recycling old proposals to end the Syrian war and selling the initiative as a minor breakthrough. Last Monday, the Security Council’s members agreed on a statement calling for a “Syrian-led political process leading to a political transition,” potentially involving “the establishment of an inclusive transitional governing body with full […]

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