In Combating Terror, Can Macron Avoid France’s Past Mistakes?

A woman lights candles at a memorial in a seaside park, Nice, France, July 18, 2016 (AP photo by Claude Paris).
A woman lights candles at a memorial in a seaside park, Nice, France, July 18, 2016 (AP photo by Claude Paris).

Buoyed by his party’s resounding success in last weekend’s parliamentary elections, France’s new president, Emmanuel Macron, is off to a strong start. While some were skeptical of his youth and inexperience—not to mention his brief participation in the unpopular government of his predecessor, Francois Hollande—Macron’s party, La Republique En Marche, is poised to become a dominant force in French politics. As one of its candidates told the Financial Times, “I’m again proud to be French.” That enthusiasm is no surprise: The French were tired of Hollande, who left office with dismal approval ratings and 10 percent national unemployment—a rate that […]

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