In Colombia, the Long Journey to Implementing Peace With the FARC Begins

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos shakes hands with FARC leader Rodrigo Londono at the signing ceremony for a revised peace pact, Bogota, Colombia, Nov. 24, 2016 (AP photo by Fernando Vergara).
Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos shakes hands with FARC leader Rodrigo Londono at the signing ceremony for a revised peace pact, Bogota, Colombia, Nov. 24, 2016 (AP photo by Fernando Vergara).

Leaders of Colombia’s Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, wearing sport jackets and khakis against the high-altitude chill, attended meetings in Bogota last week, a city they hadn’t seen in decades, if ever. In Colombia, unlike anywhere else in the world in 2016, a once-intractable conflict has ended. The peace accord between the government and the FARC guerrillas, which puts an end to 52 years of fighting, cleared one of its last formal hurdles on Dec. 13. Colombia’s Constitutional Court ruled that laws needed to implement the accord’s commitments could be passed in a matter of weeks using a […]

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