Protesters Won’t Be Swayed by Algeria’s Election Theater

Demonstrators take to the streets to protest against the government and reject the upcoming presidential elections, in Algiers, Algeria, Dec. 11, 2019 (AP photo by Toufik Doudou).
Demonstrators take to the streets to protest against the government and reject the upcoming presidential elections, in Algiers, Algeria, Dec. 11, 2019 (AP photo by Toufik Doudou).

For 10 months, weekly mass protests have rocked Algeria, as demonstrators have taken to the streets with sweeping demands that the country’s entire entrenched regime step aside. This standoff between protesters and Algeria’s generals is about to enter a new phase with Thursday’s presidential election. Rather than a genuine chance to elect a new government, the vote, forced through by the generals over popular objections, is an attempt to rebuild the political structure that Algerians have been trying to bring down since their protest movement erupted in February: a military dictatorship with a civilian façade. The results of the election […]

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