At 60, Algeria’s Aging Regime Shows No Sign of Letting Go

Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune speaks with the press ahead of a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, in Algiers, Algeria, March 30, 2022 (AP photo by Jacquelyn Martin).
Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune speaks with the press ahead of a meeting with U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, in Algiers, Algeria, March 30, 2022 (AP photo by Jacquelyn Martin).
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On July 5, Algeria celebrated the 60th anniversary of its independence with a military parade in the capital city, Algiers, complete with tanks, helicopters and missile launchers, moving along roads lined with the national flag. The event was meant to celebrate a pivotal day in 1962, when the country officially bucked French colonial rule after fighting a brutal, eight-year war of liberation. But for many, the vision of military hardware parading across the capital that sunny, summer day served instead as a reminder of all that has gone wrong since independence. According to Mourad Ouchichi, a professor of political science […]

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