In Afghanistan, Good Intentions Not Enough

In Afghanistan, Good Intentions Not Enough

KAPISA PROVINCE, Afghanistan -- Over scalding cups of tea in mid-February, an elder in Nijrab, Afghanistan said to me, "For two years you have come here and asked me the same questions. I like you, I like the French, but you people never learn."

He was referring to the generic questions Westerners ask Afghans: What is your life like? Where is the Taliban? What are your village's needs? This particular elder has regular contact with American troops, and likes Americans enough to have tea with us. Nevertheless, he was deeply frustrated by the way, for all our questions, we never seem to learn from our experiences.

Very few people in Kapisa province assume that coalition forces are there to do them harm. They acknowledge that ISAF behaves fundamentally differently than the Soviets did. Yet as the seventh year of the war begins, there is enormous frustration with the coalition for not learning from its mistakes, and also with the Afghan government for being unresponsive.

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