Hungary’s Orban a Threat to ‘Liberal Democracy’—and EU Norms

Hungary’s Orban a Threat to ‘Liberal Democracy’—and EU Norms
Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban arrives for an EU summit at the European Council building in Brussels, July 16, 2014 (AP photo by Geert Vanden Wijngaert).

Nations across Europe are commemorating the centennial of World War I, but in Hungary the bitter memory of the war has always lingered. Hungary lost two-thirds of its territory in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon, which left roughly one-third of ethnic Magyars in neighboring countries. Even today, maps with the pre-Trianon borders are a common sight in Hungary, a country whose nationalist drift is increasingly a source of alarm within the European Union. In April, Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s conservative Fidesz party maintained its majority in parliament in national elections, which also saw 20 percent of the vote go to […]

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