Human Capital: The Philippines’ Labor Export Model

Human Capital: The Philippines’ Labor Export Model
New Filipino professional nurses take their oaths during a ceremony at a convention center, Manila, Philippines, Sept. 20, 2010 (AP photo by Bullit Marquez).

The Philippines’ labor export system is a potential model for other developing countries. But there are concerns about how Filipino migrants are treated abroad, as well as the potential effects of a skills drain at home. In the 1970s, in order to address an escalating unemployment rate and balance of payments crisis, the Philippine government adopted a comprehensive range of policies that, among other things, systematically encouraged the export of contract labor from throughout the country. The program, developed during the long military dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, was rationalized as a temporary measure to address the country’s immediate problems. Four […]

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