How Turkey Could Be a Big Energy Winner After the Iran Deal

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan after receiving an honorary doctorate from Qatar University, Doha, Dec. 2, 2015 (AP photo by Yasin Bulbul).
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan after receiving an honorary doctorate from Qatar University, Doha, Dec. 2, 2015 (AP photo by Yasin Bulbul).
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During Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s visit to Qatar in early December, Ankara and Doha signed a memorandum of understanding for the long-term trade of liquefied natural gas. While a final agreement has yet to be completed, it was still a significant step for gas-dependent Turkey, which is trying to diversify its sources of imported natural gas and reduce its reliance on Russia, which accounted for 57 percent of Turkey’s gas imports in 2013. With ties fraying between Ankara and Moscow after Turkey shot down a Russian fighter jet along the Turkish-Syrian border in November, raising the possibility of Russia […]

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