How the U.S. Can Recommit Itself to the Rules of an Open World

How the U.S. Can Recommit Itself to the Rules of an Open World
U.S. President Donald Trump delivers a speech to the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, New York, Sept. 25, 2018 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).

The pursuit of an open world, I wrote last week, animated U.S. postwar planning during President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration. The United States sought an international order based on collective security, nondiscriminatory commerce and political self-determination, governed by multilateral institutions. As an objective that promised to balance national sovereignty with common rules of coexistence, it was deeply in U.S. national interests. That same vision has never been more relevant than it is today, when the defining global struggle pits defenders of openness against forces of closure. Preserving an open world—as scholars Mira Rapp-Hooper and Rebecca Friedman Lissner have recently argued—should […]

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