How the TPP Could Disrupt U.S. Aid Plans in Central America

U.S. Vice President Joe Biden with the presidents of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and the Inter-American Development Bank, Washington, Nov. 14, 2014 (AP photo by Susan Walsh).
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden with the presidents of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras and the Inter-American Development Bank, Washington, Nov. 14, 2014 (AP photo by Susan Walsh).

During his remaining time in office, U.S. President Barack Obama is pushing hard to finalize the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), the major free trade deal between the United States and 11 Pacific Rim countries. The Obama administration is also intent on providing significant new aid to reduce violence, support development and build institutions in Central America. At first blush, the two appear unrelated; the TPP includes no Central American countries. Yet the deal’s final shape may actually play an important part in determining whether the Obama administration will meet its policy and security goals in Central America, since it could unintentionally […]

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