How the Hobbesian Trump Team Will Cope With Terrorism, Climate and Nukes

A South Korean environmental activist wearing a gas mask and bearing a sign denouncing the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate accord participates in a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy, Seoul, June 5, 2017 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).
A South Korean environmental activist wearing a gas mask and bearing a sign denouncing the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate accord participates in a protest in front of the U.S. Embassy, Seoul, June 5, 2017 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Free Newsletter

This past week brought some further clarity to the underlying assumptions that drive U.S. President Donald Trump’s foreign policy. There’s now enough information to determine that the Trump team’s worldview is based on deeply held premises about the nasty, brutish nature of the human condition. He and his team are systematically walking away from the U.S. government’s decades-long emphasis on international cooperation and the architecture that supports it. The shift will have particularly dire consequences for the global community’s capacity to confront terrorism and climate change, with its impact on nuclear nonproliferation still an open question. In the aftermath of […]

TO READ MORE

Enter your email to get instant access to this article and to receive our free email newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having your own personal researcher and analyst for news and events around the globe. Become a member now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of 15,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Daily links to must-read news, analysis, and opinion from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • Weekly in-depth reports, including features on important countries and issues.
  • Your choice of weekly region-specific newsletters, delivered to your inbox.
  • Smartphone- and tablet-friendly website.

And all of this is available to you — right now for just $12 for the first 12 weeks.

More World Politics Review