How Nigeria’s Activists Can Keep the #EndSARS Movement Alive

People drive past burnt toll gates showing anti-police slogans, in Lagos, Nigeria, Oct. 23, 2020 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).
People drive past burnt toll gates showing anti-police slogans, in Lagos, Nigeria, Oct. 23, 2020 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).

Oct. 20 might be remembered as the day Nigeria’s historic uprising against police brutality died. The government’s use of live ammunition against peaceful demonstrators that day reportedly killed at least 12 people and injured dozens more. As President Muhammadu Buhari implicitly threatened to crack down again, the Feminist Coalition, one of the Nigerian organizations spearheading the protest movement, released a statement refusing further donations and calling for Nigerian youth to observe curfews and stay home. The streets of Lagos, Nigeria’s most populous city and the one-time epicenter of the demonstrations, are now clear of the tens of thousands of people […]

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