How Democrats Can Learn to Stop Worrying and Still Hate Kissinger

Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton during an interview by PBS' Charlie Rose, at the State Department, Washington April 20, 2011 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
Former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and then-Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton during an interview by PBS' Charlie Rose, at the State Department, Washington April 20, 2011 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).

Editor’s note: This will be Michael Cohen’s final “Reality Check” column at World Politics Review. We’d like to take this opportunity to thank Michael for the thought-provoking and iconoclastic analysis he has offered WPR readers each week for the past year, and wish him continued success. Let me make one thing clear at the outset of this piece: I consider Henry Kissinger to be, morally speaking, a monstrous figure. His backing of the Nixon administration’s illegal bombing campaign in Cambodia and the invasion of the country in 1970, along with his support for right-wing coups in Latin America and anti-Communist […]

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