How Bolivia’s Morales Weathered Latin America’s Backlash Against the Left

How Bolivia’s Morales Weathered Latin America’s Backlash Against the Left
Bolivian President Evo Morales speaks during a joint press conference with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Ankara, Turkey, April 9, 2019 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).

Not much remains of the “pink tide” of leftist governments that swept across Latin America in the 2000s, riding the long commodities boom. After the boom came the bust, and with it widespread voter dissatisfaction. Where free elections have been held, most of the region has subsequently swung to the right. There are, of course, some exceptions, most notoriously in Venezuela. President Nicolas Maduro, who came to office in 2013 as the handpicked successor of the leader who launched the wave, Hugo Chavez, continues to preside over one of the worst economic and humanitarian disasters in recent Latin American history. […]

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