How Bhutan’s New Government Might Navigate Its Rival Neighbors, China and India

A Bhutanese child sits as adults in traditional costume stand in a queue to cast their votes for the nation’s parliamentary election outside a polling station at Rikhey, Bhutan, April 23, 2013 (AP photo by Anupam Nath).
A Bhutanese child sits as adults in traditional costume stand in a queue to cast their votes for the nation’s parliamentary election outside a polling station at Rikhey, Bhutan, April 23, 2013 (AP photo by Anupam Nath).
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The small Himalayan nation of Bhutan held national elections this fall for the third time since implementing multiparty democracy in 2008. As in the previous vote, in 2013, the incumbent party was ousted. Lotay Tshering, leader of the victorious Druk Nyamrup Tshogpa party, was sworn in as prime minister on Wednesday. He will now seek to follow through on campaign promises to improve social services and tackle Bhutan’s growing income gap. On the foreign policy front, the new government is expected to try to reduce its reliance on neighboring India, even as China is looking to expand its influence in […]

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