Ethiopia Just Might Have a Chance for Peace

Members of the Ethiopian military parade with national flags attached to their rifles at a rally to show support for the Ethiopian National Defense Force, in Meskel square in downtown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Nov. 7, 2021 (AP photo).
Members of the Ethiopian military parade with national flags attached to their rifles at a rally to show support for the Ethiopian National Defense Force, in Meskel square in downtown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Nov. 7, 2021 (AP photo).
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During an African Union summit on humanitarian work in late May, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed affirmed his government’s “commitment to ensuring assistance reaches those afflicted by natural and manmade disasters,” and called on international partners to “scale up their support for humanitarian services across the continent.” The statement drew the ire of some commentators, who regarded it as an empty promise at a time when Ethiopia itself is enduring a dire humanitarian crisis, particularly in the war-ravaged northern region of Tigray and the neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar, to which forces under Abiy’s command have contributed. Nevertheless, Abiy’s statement […]

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