Hong Kong’s Beleaguered Protesters Struggle to Win the War of Narratives

A protester shows a sign to stranded travelers during a demonstration at the airport in Hong Kong, Aug. 13, 2019 (AP photo by Kin Cheung).
A protester shows a sign to stranded travelers during a demonstration at the airport in Hong Kong, Aug. 13, 2019 (AP photo by Kin Cheung).

Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, WPR Newsletter and Engagement Editor Benjamin Wilhelm curates the week’s top news and expert analysis on China. “After months of prolonged resistance, we are frightened, angry and exhausted.” The contrite message, part of a lengthy apology sent to reporters Wednesday and signed “from Hong Kong protesters seeking democracy and freedom,” came after four days of demonstrations at Hong Kong International Airport that caused hundreds of flight cancellations and several violent incidents. The protests were largely peaceful until Tuesday, when scuffles broke out between passengers and demonstrators, who had blocked the departure gates. Later that evening, protesters […]

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