Habre Trial Raises Hopes for Justice in Chad, and Across Africa

Security personnel surround former Chadian dictator Hissene Habre inside the court, Dakar, Senegal, July 20, 2015 (AP photo by Ibrahima Ndiaye).
Security personnel surround former Chadian dictator Hissene Habre inside the court, Dakar, Senegal, July 20, 2015 (AP photo by Ibrahima Ndiaye).
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The trial of Hissene Habre, the former leader of Chad, on charges of war crimes, crimes against humanity and torture has begun in the Senegalese capital, Dakar. Habre, who ruled Chad from 1982 to 1990, is accused of presiding over a network of secret police known by its French acronym, the DDS, which carried out systematic torture and disappearances during his rule. A Chadian truth commission in the 1990s established that there could have been as many as 40,000 victims. The reopening of the trial at the Palace of Justice in Dakar on Monday was a media spectacle—amid chaotic scenes, […]

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