Guatemala’s Anti-Corruption Fight Goes On, Despite Morales’ Flaws

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and Defense Minister Williams Mansilla reviewing troops, Guatemala City, Jan. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Moises Castillo).
Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales and Defense Minister Williams Mansilla reviewing troops, Guatemala City, Jan. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Moises Castillo).

On Jan. 14, comedian Jimmy Morales was inaugurated as president of Guatemala, unexpectedly sweeping to power after successfully tapping into the public’s repudiation of the political establishment to win the country’s election last fall. Running under the slogan “neither corrupt nor a thief,” Morales was able to appeal to a citizenry that, following revelations of massive corruption scandals, had taken to the streets to demand greater government accountability and forced the resignation of then-President Otto Perez Molina and Vice President Roxana Baldetti. Voters were willing to overlook Morales’ lack of concrete policy proposals, handing him a landslide victory over former […]

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