Guatemala’s Anti-Corruption Drive Ousted One President. Can It Take Down Another?

Protesters burn an effigy of Guatemala’s president, Jimmy Morales, during a demonstration in support of Ivan Velasquez, chief of a U.N.-backed anti-corruption commission, in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Aug. 28, 2017 (AP photo by Luis Soto).
Protesters burn an effigy of Guatemala’s president, Jimmy Morales, during a demonstration in support of Ivan Velasquez, chief of a U.N.-backed anti-corruption commission, in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Aug. 28, 2017 (AP photo by Luis Soto).
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Two years ago, Guatemalans succeeded in pushing then-President Otto Perez Molina and Vice President Roxanna Baldetti out of office for corruption, thanks to the help of the U.N.-backed International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, or CICIG. Through its investigations, which brought thousands of protesters out into the streets, the commission found that Perez Molina’s administration had led a high-level graft ring, taking bribes from international businesses rather than collecting taxes for the state. Both leaders are currently in prison. It was an unprecedented moment of accountability for a country that suffers from high rates of impunity. But it was just […]

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