Greece Continues Its Privatization Drive, But at What Cost?

Workers shout slogans during a protest against privatization outside the Greek Parliament, Athens, Sept. 27, 2016 (AP photo by Petros Giannakouris).
Workers shout slogans during a protest against privatization outside the Greek Parliament, Athens, Sept. 27, 2016 (AP photo by Petros Giannakouris).
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Free Newsletter

In late November, Greece announced that it was pulling out of plans to sell a 66 percent stake in the Greek national gas operator Desfa to Azerbaijan’s state energy company, SOCAR, complicating Greek efforts to meet its privatization targets set out by the terms of its bailout agreement. In an email interview, John N. Kallianiotis, a professor at the University of Scranton, discusses Greece’s privatization program. WPR: What are Greece’s privatization obligations under its bailout agreement, and how much progress has been made on the privatization program? John N. Kallianiotis: The administrator of the Greek privatization plan is the Hellenic […]

TO READ MORE

Enter your email to get instant access to this article and to receive our free email newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having your own personal researcher and analyst for news and events around the globe. Become a member now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of 15,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Daily links to must-read news, analysis, and opinion from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • Weekly in-depth reports, including features on important countries and issues.
  • Your choice of weekly region-specific newsletters, delivered to your inbox.
  • Smartphone- and tablet-friendly website.

And all of this is available to you — right now for just $1 for the first 3 months.

More World Politics Review