Globalization Isn’t to Blame for Americans’ Anti-Trade Sentiment. Trump Is

Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer during a campaign rally, Oct. 13, 2016, Cincinnati, Oh. (AP photo by John Minchillo).
Supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump cheer during a campaign rally, Oct. 13, 2016, Cincinnati, Oh. (AP photo by John Minchillo).

Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series inviting authors to identify the biggest priority—whether a threat, risk, opportunity or challenge—facing the international order and U.S. foreign policy today. Anti-trade sentiment in the United States, embodied in Republican candidate Donald Trump’s campaign for the presidency, has risen dramatically over the past two years. The conventional wisdom says that protectionism is on the rise due to the economic impact of globalization. Free trade agreements have cost U.S. jobs and driven down wages in many regions of the country, which has fueled the backlash and aided Trump’s rise. The […]

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