Ghana’s Perfect Storm: Is Africa’s Model Democracy in Danger of Faltering?

Ghanaian President John Dramani Mahama speaks during his inauguration ceremony, Accra, Ghana, Jan. 7, 2013 (AP photo by Gabriela Barnuevo).
Ghanaian President John Dramani Mahama speaks during his inauguration ceremony, Accra, Ghana, Jan. 7, 2013 (AP photo by Gabriela Barnuevo).

On Dec. 7, 2016, Ghanaians are scheduled to vote in the country’s seventh general election since the return of multiparty politics in 1992, when Ghana transitioned from military to civilian rule. Ghana is considered to be one of Africa’s most mature democracies. Presidential term limits are firmly in place. Political power has peacefully alternated between the country’s two main parties, the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and the New Patriotic Party (NPP). Electoral disputes have generally been resolved through the electoral commission or the courts, and not through violent means. Ghana is often praised for its stability, peace and democratic development. […]

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