Germany’s Asylum-Seekers Are Caught Between Isolation and Integration

Cabins inside a hangar are used as a temporary emergency shelter for asylum-seekers, Berlin, Germany, Dec. 9, 2015 (AP photo by Markus Schreiber).
Cabins inside a hangar are used as a temporary emergency shelter for asylum-seekers, Berlin, Germany, Dec. 9, 2015 (AP photo by Markus Schreiber).
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BERLIN, Germany—One year on from a historic wave of migration to Germany, a myriad of challenges remain. And the stakes are high, not only for Angela Merkel’s increasingly unpopular chancellorship. In July, the first Islamist-inspired attacks by asylum-seekers on German soil trained an international spotlight on the country’s efforts to integrate more than a million new arrivals. Last year’s chaotic scenes, which saw hundreds of thousands of asylum-seekers and migrants cross German borders within a few months, have long since given way to a more sober approach. Responding to a perceived shift in public mood after foreigners attacked women in […]

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