Gambia’s Elections Are Putting Its Democratic Transition to the Test

Gambian President Adama Barrow addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at the United Nations headquarters, Sept. 25, 2018 (AP photo by Frank Franklin II).
Gambian President Adama Barrow addresses the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at the United Nations headquarters, Sept. 25, 2018 (AP photo by Frank Franklin II).

Gambia will vote in a presidential election on Dec. 4 for the first time since former President Yahya Jammeh was defeated in December 2016 by incumbent Adama Barrow, ending 22 years of oppressive rule that was marked by widespread human rights violations. The ballot is expected to be a critical test for the country’s ongoing transition from dictatorship to democracy, amid concerns that interference from Jammeh, who is in exile in Equatorial Guinea, could threaten national cohesion and stability.  “We are facing a very uncertain moment,” Fatou Jagne Senghore, the West Africa director for the human rights NGO Article 19, […]

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