From the Gulf to Egypt, Foreign Powers Are Playing With Fire in Sudan

People take part in a protest in Khartoum, Sudan, July 18, 2019 (AP photo by Mahmoud Hjaj).
People take part in a protest in Khartoum, Sudan, July 18, 2019 (AP photo by Mahmoud Hjaj).
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A cast of foreign actors is seeking to shape Sudan’s incomplete political transition after the fall of longtime President Omar al-Bashir, each nudging it in the direction they favor. Their competing agendas are complicating negotiations between the ruling Transitional Military Council and civilians in the pro-democracy movement represented by the Forces for Freedom and Change. The two sides reached a major agreement on July 5 to jointly manage a three-year transition to civilian rule, and there was a recent breakthrough on Aug. 4, as they finalized that July deal and thrashed out its details. Yet the transition remains fragile and […]

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