France’s Security Law Debacle Shows the Dangers of Macron’s ‘Le Pen-Lite’ Agenda

Demonstrators hold effigies of French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin, French President Emmanuel Macron and Paris police prefect Didier Lallement during a demonstration in Paris, Nov. 28, 2020 (AP photo by Francois Mori).
Demonstrators hold effigies of French Interior Minister Gerald Darmanin, French President Emmanuel Macron and Paris police prefect Didier Lallement during a demonstration in Paris, Nov. 28, 2020 (AP photo by Francois Mori).

It’s been a long time since anyone in France thought of Emmanuel Macron as a centrist politician bridging the left-right partisan divide, as he has often portrayed himself. But after the events of the past few weeks, the French president is fending off charges of being an authoritarian wolf in liberal sheep’s clothing. His latest misstep involves the now-infamous security bill that his government was forced to partially withdraw this week due to popular protests against some of its sweeping measures. The entire episode has put Macron’s attempts to co-opt the far right in the spotlight, even as it highlights […]

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