The U.S. Intelligence Community’s Harrowing Take on Our Possible Futures

The U.S. Intelligence Community’s Harrowing Take on Our Possible Futures
A girl holds a globe at a climate change protest in Mumbai, India, Sept. 27, 2019 (AP photo by Rafiq Maqbool).

Every few years, the U.S. National Intelligence Council, or NIC, gazes into its crystal ball and imagines the world 20 years hence. The latest installment, released on April 8, is a harrowing read. “Global Trends 2040: A More Contested World” anticipates an era even more chaotic and divided than our own, in which institutions at all levels struggle to adapt to abrupt demographic shifts, economic turbulence, runaway climate change and technological innovation. The COVID-19 pandemic, which has left governments thrashing and multilateral institutions flailing, is the shape of things to come. “Global Trends 2040” is the seventh in a series […]

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