For the U.S. and Russia, ‘Stable and Predictable’ Would Be a Good Start

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, in Reykjavik, Iceland, May 19, 2021 (pool photo by Saul Loeb via AP Images).
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, meets with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, in Reykjavik, Iceland, May 19, 2021 (pool photo by Saul Loeb via AP Images).

When U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken met last month with his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, in Reykjavik, it prompted inevitable comparisons with another high-level encounter in Iceland’s capital: the famous October 1986 summit between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev that set the stage for the thawing of the Cold War. As the current American and Russian leaders, Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin, prepare for their first summit on June 16 in Geneva, prospects are slim for the kind of breakthrough achieved by Reagan and Gorbachev. Tensions remain high due to Russia’s 2014 annexation of Crimea and subsequent invasion of […]

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