Fixating on the ISIS Connection in Eastern Congo Will Make Things Worse

Congolese soldiers patrol the streets of Beni, Congo, July 16, 2019 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
Congolese soldiers patrol the streets of Beni, Congo, July 16, 2019 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).

In early May, in a televised address, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s president, Felix Tshisekedi, declared martial law in North Kivu and Ituri, two provinces on the country’s eastern border with Uganda and Rwanda, and placed them under military rule. In justifying this draconian measure, Tshisekedi invoked the regular mass killings in the region, which have left more than 1,000 people dead since 2019 and have generally been ascribed to one local militant group: the Allied Democratic Forces. Days later, a delegation from the Ugandan army arrived in Beni to set up a coordination center for a joint offensive with […]

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